Recent Blog Posts

Outdoor Writer Reviews


Nov 13, 2012

Field testing new outdoor equipment is both exciting and frustrating. If you’re like the average, obsessive hunter/angler, you might spend a few hours reading reams of online content to determine what the best deer stand is for specific situations or what lures work best for topwater bass fishing. The problem is, with so many articles and reviews on the net, it’s hard to determine what is wheat and what is chaff.

A good rule of thumb is to determine if the writer/reviewer is a person that sits in an office writing paid reviews (it happens all the time) or if the person is the type that gets dirty. Obviously, you want to read about a product and how it works from someone that actually gets out into the woods and puts the product to use. In that vein, I’d like to mention Drew Hall, a blogger over at OutdoorWriter.net who is a self proclaimed, “southern hunter and angler, that just so happens to be schooled as a journalist.”

Drew has an active blog that covers a wide range of topics. It’s clear that he gets dirty during the season and also clear that he loves to tell his readers all about it. His prime obsessions are deer, duck and bass and he writes about his experiences and the equipment he uses to make his chosen sports that




A Hunters Retreat


Nov 05, 2012

November has officially arrived and the woods are alive with the sounds of hunters. On any given morning out here in the Montana wilderness you can hear the repeats of shots fired – each, most assuredly a success that will bring meat to the table. In addition to the usual fare of deer, elk, antelope and moose (and the occasional bear and lion), this year folks are on the hunt for another predator, the wolf. As of the time I wrote this article, hunters had bagged 39 wolves statewide. Not a bad number this far into the season.

I hope everyone is out in good country this year, regardless of which state you are in, finding fresh trails, and catching big game. For those of you that are stuck home or are just between outings, I ran across a hunting blog that I wanted to share.

Outdoorfreaks.net is a place that touts, “Fresh Air, Good People, Lasting Memories”, and if you take a look around their site you immediately get a feeling for what they mean.  The blog is a consortium of outdoor enthusiast that write about what they love best – the outdoors! They have reviews, tips, and stories about every hunting related issue you can imagine. There is no wrong place to start looking around, but my suggestion is to start out by clicking the ‘Epic Stuff’ tab which is a collection of their best stories as ranked by themselves. Lots of good stuff.

So take the time to dig around their site as you get ready for your next early morning stroll through the woods. And, good luck out there.




Game Camera Review: Spypoint Tiny Wireless


Oct 31, 2012

The Spypoint Tiny Wireless Camera is not cheap at roughly $300. And, a quick look at it's features has you scratching your head, why a camera with these stats might cost so much. That is, until you realize that this little camera has something that most other cameras do not. Backup storage.

That's right, this little, feature packed camera, takes pictures and stores them on an SD card, but then also transmits the picture file to a 'black box' that is hidden within 250 feet of the camera. This is a great feature for if the camera or SD card fails, because now you have a backup. But, even more so, its a way of dealing with camera poachers since even if they steal the camera, you will still have access to pictures of the thief.

Even though you pay extra for the 'black box' feature, this camera still has a some decent stats. All around average trigger times, with a long recovery time and detection and flash ranges that won't cause your head to turn, but will leave you feeling like you got your moneys worth. This camera isn't going to  make your friends jealous, but its well worth the cost and it's easy to use. Check out a few pictures to see for yourself.

Have any experience with the Spypoint Tiny Wireless? Let us know your thoughts.

 

 




Game Camera Review: Slate River T Post Mount


Oct 29, 2012

Every time you drag your camera (or cameras) out into the field, you have to decide where your going to set them it up. It's no small decision and hopefully it comes based on your experience in the area you are hunting. Although blind luck is the moral to many a hunting story, having an understanding of the wilderness and our prey is the primary reason many hunters enjoy – 'hunting'. In a sense, we hunt for success as much as we hunt for animals.

Most deer cameras come with a strap and a mechanism for attaching the camera to a tree. Nearly 90 percent of the time this works very well in the forests and fields we hunt. But, sometimes you need something a little more adjustable to get the right angle or the perfect position. And what if there isn't a tree in sight? What can you do then?

Well, this might be the perfect time to look into the Slate River T post mount. This simple contraption allows you to attach your camera to a common t post –those green posts you use to make quick fences.  Setting up a camera along a fence line is never a bad idea, especially if you know where the game is typically crossing. But, even better is bringing a lite T pole along with you to hammer into the ground. This way you can set your cameras up anywhere without worrying about trees.

The only thing I don't like about the mount is that it makes it hard to lock up your camera. What do you think. Does this mount look like it would be useful to you?




Game Camera Review: Reconyx


Oct 23, 2012

“See what you've been missing”, is the slogan for Reconyx, a top of the line producer of game, trail and security cameras. And this slogan isn't bragging. Reconyx builds cameras that capture wildlife and the great outdoors with clarity and purpose. Check out this action photo of a bobcat capturing a turkey.


This is just one image from a slew on their site that show just how good their cameras are at short and long distance.

Like most camera companies out there, they have a range of cameras that are set up for different scouting needs. The HC600 HyperFire is their No-Glow camera with a top of the line package that does not leave you wanting more. The HC500 HyperFire is a Low-glow, Semi-Covert Infrared Nigh Vision camera with a 50 foot range for pictures. In the white flash department they have the HC550 – which can take full color photos from up to 30 feet away.

Cuddeback, Moultrie and Bushnell each have multiple lines of professional cameras on the market. Each of these companies have cameras with features that bring out the best of certain situations. Few o these companies, however, have cameras like those that Reconyx make. If you have the cash, this is a line that you seriously want to take a look at.

Do you have experience with Reconyx. Let us know what you think.




Game Camera Review: Solar Power Charger


Oct 19, 2012

It's no fun to have to mess around with a game camera that eats through 8 AA batteries every month or so. In fact, with some game cameras it can get downright expensive keeping up with replacing batteries. Rechargeable batteries work OK, but you still have to take them home and bring replacements every time you go out to check on your footage. If you're sick of dealing with the mess of batteries, then it might be time for you to get a solar panel for your game camera.

There are a few companies that make solar panels specifically for game cameras, but Moultrie's model really stands above the rest in terms of price and features. Their panel is compatible with Moultrie cameras made after 2007. The panel comes with an LED screen built it for monitoring power, charge and other statistics. The panel also has a battery built right in creating a high rating in the ease of use category. You can mount it easily to a tree or pool, its weather resistant and it has a nice long 10 foot cord so you can find a sunny spot.

So take the time to look into these hand solar panels. Having to worry about batteries and charging is a pain that you just don't need when dealing with coming and going to your camera. And less worry is something that we all need more of. Let us know if you've used this Moultrie solar panel or any other solar panel and what your experience is. We want to know.




Game Camera Review: DIY Wireless Trail Camera


Oct 16, 2012

Getting a new trail camera is fun and gives you a lot of opportunities to expand your hunting horizons with the information that you can gather. But, slogging out into the woods every weekend to see what you caught in terms of stills or video can be a hassle in the off season. That's why, some hunters have turned to rigging and setting up their camera to transmit wireless feeds, allowing them to track the footage of their camera from home.

It sounds complicated to set up, but over at eHow, it's all spelled out as simple as can be. All you need to start is an IP based web camera, along with a cellular router. These items are not very expensive and there are a ton to choose from. From there the folks at ehow walk you through the process of putting all the parts and pieces together to effectively create a system that you can use from the comfort of your own home.

I know many people don't agree with the use of game and trail cameras for hunting. In fact, in many states, like Montana, the use of hunting cameras is illegal during hunting season – since scouting is part of hunting. But, during the off season if you want to track wildlife for hunting or just for hobby, this seems like a really fun way to go about it. So check it out and let us know if you have your own system for remote viewing.




Game Camera Review: No Spook Cameras


Oct 12, 2012

In the world of trail and game cameras, it's important to review and understand your options. One of the best new features that comes on most mid-high range cameras is a low or no-glow flash. This is an important concept, because a typical flash will tend to scare deer and other game away pretty quickly. This can lead to missing out on a slew of pictures that you would have otherwise have gotten. The following is a list of 4 great cameras that use black flash technology to hide the fact that your quarry is being photographed.

Bushnell Trophy Cam HD Max
This is a camera that's on the market for around $250. It has a ton of features including 8 megapixel clarity and the ability to record video at high resolution with sound. The black flash feature on this device is undetectable from nearly any range, but it does have a limited flash range of approximately 45 feet, which in the world of cameras is on the low end. Still a great camera for 2012.

Moultrie Outfitter No-Glow C-50
This Moultrie trail camera has black flash technology to keep the game around long after you've captured their picture. With 5 megapixels of resolution –not the highedst on the market by far – your able to get decent quality pictures day or night. All in all, this camera has good features that make it a great buy versus quality and ease of use.

Eyecon Black Widow
The Eyecon line is a new series of cameras from Big Game Treestands. This hunting camera is a screaming deal at $150, packed with the features you need to get out and spot game. But, this camera does have small amounts of light emitting in the form of two blinking lights that can be spotted from up to 15 feet away. Regardless, with 50 feet of flash space, this camera has all the makings of a winner.

Stealth Cam Sniper Shadow

If there was a contest for how sneaky your camera sounded just by it's name alone, then Stealth Cam Sniper Shadow would be the hands down winner. This unrealisticly named trail camera has a realistic 8 megapixel camera propped up behind a battery of 54 No Glo Night Vision LEDs. All of those LEDs were nearly invisible regardless of how close you are to the camera, making it a true no-glo device that is sure to work out well in the woods. And at roughly $220, well worth the price to play.

So take the time to look at some of these great black flash cameras that get you that much closer to a freezer full of meat at the end of the season. And let us know if you have any experience with these cameras. We want to know!




Game Camera Review: Moultrie


Oct 08, 2012

When it comes to game cameras, none get more constantly high marks than the series from Moultrie. As a company with a long history in deer feeders, Moultrie has been in the realm of hunting supplies and products for over 30 years. It only made sense that they would begin to produce hunting optics that carry the same great quality.

Moultries long dabbled in regular trail cameras for tracking deer and other game. In 2012 they came out with the M-80 Black, the M-80 XT, the M-100 and the D55ir XT. All of these cameras score well among hunters for their size, quality and ease of use. However, all of these cameras have different aspects that make them useful in certain situations and fields of use. The difference between a no-glow flash and an IR flash being just one of the features that sticks out immediately.

Beyond the regular cameras that they produce and improve on yearly, they also have the Moultrie Game Spy Game Management System. This system allows you to view the action that your camera sees from the comfort of your own home. By logging into your camera via the internet you are able to view all the pictures and activity without slogging into the woods. It's these types of innovations that keeps Moultrie ahead of the pack.

Although Moultrie has many great cameras, they still have work to do to get to the top of the heap. But,  if your looking for your first camera and want performance and value, make sure you take a look at what Moultrie has to offer.




Game Camera Reviews


Oct 05, 2012
It can be hard to know what to look for the first time you realize you want to start using a game camera to enhance your hunting season. With so many brands on the market –all of which seem good – how can you determine which one is right for you? Well, this is a topic that has been revisited time and time again, but there are a few basic items that you should look at and compare on game cameras. Once you know a few things to pay attention to, you can start to compare cameras and get an idea of what you need to succeed.

Before we launch into some of the basics behind a good game camera, you need to stop and think about what it is you need out of a camera. If your looking for a few good still shots during the day, that's going to be much different than getting good videos at night. You'll also need to consider how long your camera will be in the woods by it's lonesome. This can effect how you think about it's battery usage and digital storage. So start mulling over how you will use the camera in the back of your mind as you think about these next topics

Trigger Speed

The trigger speed relates to how quickly the picture can take a camera after it detects movement within the range of the camera. It may not seem like a big deal at first, but if an animal is moving fast through the range of a camera, a half second can mean the difference between getting a clean shot and missing it altogether.

Recovery Time

Once a camera takes a picture at night, it has to recharge and get ready for the next shot. This can take several seconds on some cameras, but some trail and game cameras can take multiple;e shots per second or 'burst'. Are you just looking for one good shot of an animal or do you want multiple shots of the same animal?

Detection Range:

Detection range relates to the area in front of the camera that is sensitive to movement and will trigger the camera to take a picture. These ranges vary considerably and it's good to know what you want and need for the area you plan to monitor.

Flash Range

Besides the detection range, you need to make sure that the flash range is adequate for your needs as well.  No sense in taking pictures of animals that are outside the range of the flash. Typically this isn't a problem, since the detection range is smaller than the flash range, but, it's always good to check.

Batteries

Cameras run on batteries unless you are lucky enough to have power nearby. Make sure your hunting camera has the battery life you need to stay outdoors for extended periods.

Dimensions

Although not the most important feature, dimensions should be considered depending on the spot you plan to set up in. A larger camera is noticeable by other hunters, which can sometimes be a problem.

There are other considerations to think about when reviewing a game camera, but paying attention to these issues is a great place to start. Let us know what attributes you look for in a good game and trail camera.



Trail Camera Reviews: Primos Truth 46


Sep 30, 2012

I've been interested in learning more about the Primos Truth 46, but haven't had much time to dig into it properly. So, I decided to hit the Internet to see what might turn up. As usual, there was the typical generic fare of what to expect with the camera, but then I ran into a decent review from Kevin Eason over at Sanctuary Outdoors. Kevin gives a great explanation of the ins and outs of what makes this wildlife camera tick.

Right off the bat he lets us know that you can get this camera for under $100 and just why that is. It turns out that the Primos, is a great deer camera, but it is a bit on the large side, making it bulky and somewhat unruly to pack around. That drawback doesn't seem to bother him however because the camera over all is easy to use and takes decent pictures for tracking and cataloging wildlife.

With a detection range between 40-50 feet (depending on conditions) and a capacity for up to 1600 pictures with a 2 gigabyte card, the Primos is a good choice for the cost. Take the time to check out his full review and let us know what you think. Do you have experience with the Primos Truth 46?




Hide Your Camera Well


Sep 26, 2012

We all know that using your trail camera to capture wildlife isn't the only way it can be used. Plenty of people have installed their cameras in their backyards or in public places to capture the actions of everyday folks as they mill about from place to place. But, this isn't always the best idea, because people don't like being spied on and when they find out, they can do bad things.

A story from Downtown Publications reports that a man in Bloomfield Township in Michigan reported his trail camera missing to police after he installed it, “in an effort to see who was littering in the area”. Turns out that over the night or at some point during the next day, the camera had been discovered and taken from the bush where he had set it up.

Setting cameras up in public places has always caused a rift between trail camera users, with one side arguing for and one side arguing against. It's a difficult argument and one that will likely continue on into the known future. One thing is for sure though, people don't like being secretly caught on film and if they find your camera, they might not leave it where sits.

Tell us what you think about trail and game cameras in hidden in public places.




Wildlife Cameras: Wild Boars Eating Oranges


Sep 24, 2012

Besides hunting, most people get into using trail cameras to see sights they just wouldn't otherwise see. With the invention of the Internet, we not only get the experience of capturing our own trail camera videos, but we get to see other videos from folks all over the world. Case in point is this wonderful capture of a group of wild boars eating oranges in South Africa.


Wild Boars are native across Africa and descendants of domestic pigs. Because they are able to breed freely amongst their species –including with domestic pigs – they have a variety of shapes and sizes. The males are distinct in older age as they grow tusks and are often a source of sport for hunters. Despite their short legs, they are quick critters and make for good hunting and eating. But, if hunting isn't your bag, they also look pretty good on film.

Surprisingly enough, there aren't that many trail camera videos from other parts of the world – at least not as many as I'd like. Perhaps there are scientists all over the world using these for biological and ecological study, but they just don’t take the time to post them to the Internet. Regardless, I hope the practice of sharing trial camera footage expands in the coming years. Viewing these great shots from around the world is not something I will soon tire from.

What country would you like to see a trail camera in and for what reason?


Trail Camera Review: Moultrie M80 Black Flash Trail Camera


Sep 19, 2012

A couple weeks ago I posted a video review that talked about the Moultrie M80. It was a good video review from an avid user, but it was a bit short. I found this longer review of the M80 that gets way more in-depth into the workings of the camera. The review comes from the folks over at Outdoor Freaks, who seem to have more than just a little knowledge on game cameras of all sorts.

Turns out the M80 is one of many new, small cameras on the market, but the menu, screen and battery compartments are all laid out well, in an easy to use format. Since these digital trail cameras rely on a card for storage, there are a slew of settings for both photos and video to maximize the number of pictures it can take before up the memory card. You can vary these setting depending on how often you are able to check up on the camera. Of course, like most newer cameras, it has trail mode, plot watch mode and a hybrid of the two. I’m interested to hear more about the hybrid mode and how it operates. Perhaps a future post.

As one of the more inexpensive black flash cameras on the market (you can pick one up for under $200), it seems like a great deal and something I want to hear more about in the future. Let us know if you have experience with this model. We'd love to hear about it.

 

 




Fleeting Images of Wildlife


Sep 14, 2012

Anyone that gets into using trail and deer cameras knows that it borders on a being a labor of love and maybe an obsession. There isn't a guarantee that the position of your camera is going to garner you any pictures. You’re travel time to place the camera, prepare the camera and monitor the camera can take hours and in some cases days. And all this work may not yield any footage or pictures at all. But, if you get lucky, you hit the jackpot and get something that makes it all worth it.

This short 8-second video shot on Indian Springs Ranch in Eureka Montana is a perfect example of how success can be measured in small quantities. The image shows two coyotes as they pass through the narrow portion of the trail camera. It's a tiny fragment of a long night over the course of what was probably many days, but it’s a thrill to see.

Every time a game camera is set out in the woods there's an expectation of what will have been captured when we return. We all wish for the herd of elk to bed down in front our private eye, but an 8-second clip of two coyotes sprinting through the back ground can often be just what it takes to make it all worth it.

What are some of your most memorable shots or footage?

 

 




Game Camera Reviews: Black Flash Cameras


Sep 10, 2012

Field and Stream Online has game camera reviews for four new products that are new to 2012. Since their introduction into the world of hunting, game cameras have been undergoing rapid changes as technology grew up around it. One of the main causes for advancement was producing a flash that wouldn't scare game away after the first picture. But, without a flash, how can you take pictures at night, when most big game is lumbering about.

 According to Lawrence Pyne who tested all four models – the Bushnell Trophy Cam HD Max, the Eyecon Black Widow, the Moultrie Outfitter No-Glow C-50 and the Stealth Cam Sniper Shadow – the key to these cameras is black flash, which uses little to no light to capture pictures. But that's not all these cameras have to offer.

Besides the ability to keep game close for the most amount of time in front of the lense, these new, smaller cameras also come packed to the gills with extras often reserved for larger cameras in their price range. Among the innovations: sensors that automatically adjust to the temperature of its surroundings so it has a better chance of knowing when game is around, larger detection and capture range up to 50ft in some cases and the ability to garner high-quality photos day and night.

Take a look at some of these great cameras and what they have to offer and let us know about your experience with black flash trail cameras!





Sep 08, 2012

Getting decent trail camera reviews online can be difficult. If you push through the written reviews in the marketplace you can pick-up some good information, but you never get a sense for the person behind the review – which is important. You want to make sure that the person giving their advice has knowledge and experience. This gives their opinion a bit of weight.

That's why I like finding video reviews about wildlife cameras. It only takes a few seconds to know if the person giving the review understands the ins and outs of their subject. This is the case with Outdoor Pride, a self described, “group of guys who enjoy hunting and fishing”, who want to share their success – via video!

In this video one of their members discusses the Moultrie M80 – an IR camera that comes with a plot watcher feature that enables the camera to snap pictures every few seconds or minutes. It's a smaller camera that is easily concealed. The real love from this video, however, is reserved for the Cuddeback Capture, which already has a solid reputation. After his glowing review he also has a bit to add about attractants. All around, worth viewing. If you have time check out their YouTube page for more videos.

What Kind of Reviews do you like better, written or video?




Black Bear Swimming Outside Missoula


Sep 01, 2012

Black Bear Swimming Outside Missoula

Montana has an overabundance amount of wildlife and wild lands from the flatlands of the Eastern part of the state to the mountainous Western regions. In between those two areas are areas filled with creatures large and small. What's great about Montana, however, is that you don't need to travel far to capture a few critters having a good a time. Case in point is this short video of a black bear swimming.

Seems the folks over at Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (Region 2), set up a Bushnell trail camera at the Fish Creek Wildlife Management Area, just a few miles outside of Missoula to the west. The purpose was to find out what animals were visiting the watering hole. To their surprise, they got this great footage of a hot bear taking advantage of a cool swimming hole.

As they state on their Facebook page, FWP is beginning to take greater advantage of trail cameras to get a better idea of what animals are inhabiting what regions and when. I hope they not only put these valuable tools to greater use, but continue to let us see their results.

Where do you think FWP should install game cameras in the state? Let us know.

 

 




50% off Bushnell Hunting Cams and Riflescopes!


May 02, 2012

I just had to post this one! 50% off Bushnell Hunting Cams and Rifle scopes, but hurry this one won't last long! There are only about 10 hours left until this offer expires! There is an entire page of great deals check them out here - Bushnell Hunting Cams 

Be sure to check them all out some are a little less than 50% off while others are a bit more. Either way there are some great deals to be had if you act fast! 

Here are a few I saw that I liked:

 

Bushnell 8MP Trophy Cam

List Price: $292.95

Sale Price: $144.95

You Save: $148.00 (51% savings)

 

 

 

 

Bushnell Pro 1600 Golf Laser Rangefinder

List price: $599.95

Sale Price: $299.98

You Save: $299.97 (50% savings)

 

 

 

Bushnell Tactical Elite 1x32 Red/Green Rifle scope

List Price: $ 281.95

Sale price: $158.85

You Save:$123.10 (44% savings)

 

 

Bushnell Nature View 8x42mm Roof Prism Binocular

List Price: $219.95

Sale Price: $123.54

You Save:$96.41 (44% savings)

 

 




5 Great Deals on Game Cameras


Nov 26, 2011

Today I want to talk about the best deals around! There are some amazing deals going on right now on Game Cameras!  

1. The Bushnell 8MP Trophy Cam Brown Night Vision Trail Cam comes up again and again for being a great camera! Bushnell is a solid name you can trust! 

List price of $295.95, but today the Bushnell Trail Camera is on sale for $150.47! That's a 49% Savings

  • 8-megapixel Night Vision trail camera with invisible 32-LED flash for 24-hour game scouting
  • 45-foot PIR motion activated sensor and flash range
  • Field Scan time-lapse technology allows you preset automatic image capture intervals
  • Up to one year of battery life; quick one-second trigger speed
  • Captures video of up to 60 seconds with audio; 32GB SD card compatible

 

2. Primos Truth Cam 35 Camera is second on my list! 

Another great price on this Primos Truth Cam. List price is $119.99, but today the Primos is on sale for $79.58 that is a 34% Savings!

  • Day/night 35-infrared LED trail camera captures still or video images of wildlife
  • 40-foot nighttime range; select the number of active LEDs (more night range or battery life)
  • 1.5-second trigger speed out of sleep; 0.3-second trigger speed when active; multi-shot bursts of 1, 3, 5, 7 or 9 images per triggering
  • Large backlit LED screen; instructions printed on camera door
  • Supports up to an eight gigabyte SD card; one-year warranty

 

 

3. 5 MP Trophy Cam Bone Collector RTAP Night Vision

List price is $316.95, but today the Bone Collector Trophy Cam is on sale for $172.99. That would be a 45% savings

  • Black & White Text LCD, 3, 5 or 8 MP high-quality full color resolution
  • Day/night autosensor, External power compatible
  • Adjustable PIR (Lo/Med/High)
  • Trigger speed one second, Trigger interval ? 1 sec. to 60 min. programmable, Multi-image mode ? 1-3 images per trigger
  • Video length ? 1 second to 60 minute delay, programmable, Widescreen, VGA, QVGA Video at 20 FPS

 

 

 


4. Stealth Cam 8MP Digital Scouting Camera/Video recorder with 36 infrared Emitters and Audio

List price would be $189.99, but today the Stealth Cam is only $81.93 that would be a 57% Savings

  • Rogue IR 8.0 MG Pixel, 36 IR emitter for 40 FT Range
  • 640x480 digital video
  • Burst mode shoots 1-9 images per triggering
  • Accepts up to 16GB SD card, 32MB built in memory.
  • Time / Date / Moon Phase / Temp stamp on picture and video files.

 

 

 

 

5. Bushnell 8MP Trophy Cam Bone Collector Trail Camera

List price would be $340.95, but today the Bushnell Bone Collector is on sale for $162.70! That is a 52% Savings!

  • 8-megapixel Night Vision trail camera with invisible 32-LED flash for 24-hour game scouting
  • 45-foot PIR motion activated sensor and flash range
  • Field Scan time-lapse technology allows you preset automatic image capture intervals
  • Up to one year of battery life; quick one-second trigger speed
  • Captures video of up to 60 seconds with audio; 32GB SD card compatible



Top 10 Game Cameras at Amazon


Nov 23, 2011

With hunting season coming to a close and the Christmas season coming into effect with the impending 'Black Friday' and 'Cyber Monday', it's time to start thinking of picking up some gear for next year. There is no better time to buy some new game cameras than now. A perfect time to add to the aresenal, replace a old unit or buy a cool gift for someone. To celebrate this, I've assembled a top 10 game camera list featuring items sold at Amazon.

1. Primos Truth Cam 35 Camera
2. Moultrie D55-IR Game Spy 5 Megapixel Digital Infrared Game Camera (Camo)
3. Wild Game Innovations Red 6 Infrared Digital Scouting Camera
4. Primos Truth Cam 46 Camera
5. Day 6 Plotwatcher Time Lapse Video Camera
6. Moultrie Game Spy M-80
7. Wild Game Innovations 6.0MP Digital Scouting Camera (Camo)
8. Stealth Cam Prowler XT 8Mp Digital Game Scouting Camera with Infrared
9. Primos Truth Cam 60 Camera
10. Spypoint 5 MP 35 Infrared Led Digital Surveilance IR-5 Camera (Camo)

It's definitely a good mix of different brands from Primos to Moultrie to Stealth to Day 6 and Wild Game Innovations. Definitely the big players in regards to game and trail cameras.




Bushnell 8MP Trophy Game camera on Sale


Nov 20, 2011

Bushnell Game Camera On SaleBushnell 8MP Trophy Cam Brown Night Vision Trail Camera

The Bushnell game camera is on sale $152.65 that is a 47% savings from its original list price of $295.95. Plus it comes with Free Super Saver Shipping!

The reviews are great on this game camera! What I see folks talking a lot about is the battery life. The battery life on this Bushnell game camera is up to one year per battery set, which is awesome! No one likes to return to their game camera only to find the batteries dies while you were away. Then you start to wonder what did I miss!

The official Product Description:

The Bushnell Trophy Cam offers 8 MP high-quality full color resolution. This Trophy Cam™ is super-tuned with advancements that will turn the industry, and that big deer, on its ear. Its still leading the way with up to 1-year battery life and 1-second trigger speed, plus now gives you the big picture of game movement with Field Scan time-lapse technology. New time-lapse technology automatically snaps images at present intervals of one minute to one hour, within the hours of your choice. Field Scan provides long-range observation of your hunting ground and a much larger coverage area, because it's not triggered by game. It's like glassing your spot without having to be there. For a more vivid viewing experience, we've added audio record to the video mode. You can also record more images and video than ever thanks to 32GB SD card compatibility. The t temperature range is -5 to 140 degrees F. The PIR sensor is motion activated out to 45 feet (Low/Medium/High). Features adjustable web belt and 1/4-20 socket/SD card slot. 

 Key Features and Specifications:

    Black and white text LCD display
    High-quality, 8-megapixel full-color image resolution
    Invisible nighttime flash with 32 LEDs
    Motion activated day/night PIR auto-sensor
    45-foot flash and sensor range
    Adjustable PIR (Low/Medium/High)
    One second trigger speed
    Programmable trigger interval: one second to 60 minutes
    Multi-image mode: one to three images per trigger
    Widescreen, VGA, QVGA video resolution with audio
    Video length: programmable from one to 60 seconds
    Field Scan Time Lapse Mode with Simultaneous Live Trigger
    Weatherproof construction prevents rain from soaking in
    Temperature range: -5 to 140 degrees Fahrenheit
    Mounts with adjustable web belt and 1/4-20 socket
    SD card slot supports up to 32GB
    Power: 4 to 8 AA batteries (not included); external power compatible
    Battery Life: up to one year per batteries set
    Dimensions: 3.5 by 5.5 inches
    Model: 119436C 

 Again the Bushnell 8MP Trophy Cam is on sale for only $152.65




Squirrel jumps into Stealth Sniper Trail Camera


Oct 11, 2011

Watch this squirrel jump right into the Stealth sniper trail camera. The turkey scared a group of squirrels who take to running.  Once jumps and runs right into the camera! If the camera hadn't been there this squirrel still would have run right into the tree! 

 

Thanks to Trailcampro!

 




Coyote captured on Bushnell Trail Camera


Oct 05, 2011

 

  Thanks to pixel scout 

At first glance I thought this pictures was taken with someone holding the camera since the coyote is perfectly positioned in the frame. But it was actually taken using a Bushnell trail camera, great capture! 

 




Bushnell 8MP Trophy Cam 47% off!


Oct 02, 2011

The Bushnell 8MP Trophy Cam Brown Night Vision Trail Camera is 47% off today! List price is $295.95, but today it's on sale for only $155.79. As an added bonus it comes with FREE Super Saver Shipping. This game camera comes with invisible 32-LED flash for 24-hour game scouting! 

The Official Product Description for the Bushnell 8MP Trophy Cam:

Product Features

    8-megapixel Night Vision trail camera with invisible 32-LED flash for 24-hour game scouting
    45-foot PIR motion activated sensor and flash range
    Field Scan time-lapse technology allows you preset automatic image capture intervals
    Up to one year of battery life; quick one-second trigger speed
    Captures video of up to 60 seconds with audio; 32GB SD card compatible

Key Features and Specifications:

    Black and white text LCD display
    High-quality, 8-megapixel full-color image resolution
    Invisible nighttime flash with 32 LEDs
    Motion activated day/night PIR auto-sensor
    45-foot flash and sensor range
    Adjustable PIR (Low/Medium/High)
    One second trigger speed
    Programmable trigger interval: one second to 60 minutes
    Multi-image mode: one to three images per trigger
    Widescreen, VGA, QVGA video resolution with audio
    Video length: programmable from one to 60 seconds
    Field Scan Time Lapse Mode with Simultaneous Live Trigger: takes images at pre-set intervals of one minute to 60 minutes, within the hours of your choice--at the same time as using the motion activated sensor.
    Weatherproof construction prevents rain from soaking in
    Temperature range: -5 to 140 degrees Fahrenheit
    Mounts with adjustable web belt and 1/4-20 socket
    SD card slot supports up to 32GB
    Power: 4 to 8 AA batteries (not included); external power compatible
    Battery Life: up to one year per batteries set
    Dimensions: 3.5 by 5.5 inches
    Model: 119436C

Product Description

The Bushnell Trophy Cam offers 8 MP high-quality full color resolution. This Trophy Cam™ is super-tuned with advancements that will turn the industry, and that big deer, on its ear. Its still leading the way with up to 1-year battery life and 1-second trigger speed, plus now gives you the big picture of game movement with Field Scan time-lapse technology. New time-lapse technology automatically snaps images at present intervals of one minute to one hour, within the hours of your choice. Field Scan provides long-range observation of your hunting ground and a much larger coverage area, because it's not triggered by game. It's like glassing your spot without having to be there. For a more vivid viewing experience, we've added audio record to the video mode. You can also record more images and video than ever thanks to 32GB SD card compatibility. The t temperature range is -5 to 140 degrees F. The PIR sensor is motion activated out to 45 feet (Low/Medium/High). Features adjustable web belt and 1/4-20 socket/SD card slot. 

Again, the Bushnell 8MP Trophy Cam is on sale for only $155.79


 




How to protect your Trail Camera


Sep 30, 2011

 We all use trail cameras for different reasons.  Whether you're a hunter, wildlife photographer or just having fun with it.  It doesn't really matter because the bottom line is... it's your camera! Your first thought might be someone will steel it, but don't forget about curious wildlife in the area.

Here is a list of 6 helpful tips when protecting your trail camera from outside elements. 

 

1. Use  protective housing. If you purchase a security box or trail camera lock box you will be able to protect it from elements, animals and theft. 

2. Find a good size tree so it can't be cut down easily.  Plus if you pick a small tree it might move in the wind causing blurry pictures anyway.  So find a good sturdy tree. 

3. Either camouflage your lock box either by painting it or by placing some near by brush around it. 

4. You might want to think about wiping down your trail camera with a scent eliminator. If you're setting your trail camera up over a feeder station make sure you keep your hands clean.  You don't want to put the feed out and then turn around a adjust the camera leaving your scent behind. 

5. Take note of where you place your camera if you're in a high traffic area think about moving the camera over a trail or two. Try to find a trail that is more frequented by animals than people. 

6. Some trail cameras will use a flash instead think about using an infrared trail camera.  This will make it less visible to anyone looking. 

 Good luck! 




Moultrie Game Spy M-80 - 20% off!


Sep 28, 2011

With over thirty years of experience Moultrie has become a product you can trust! Right now the Moultrie Game Spy M-80 list price is $149.99, but today it's on sale for $119.95 plus FREE Super Saver Shipping.

Here is the official product description for the Moultrie Game Spy M-80:

Product Features
  • 5.0 megapixel infrared game camera, 16:9 widescreen images and videos provide a wider field of view than standard game cameras
  • 3 operational modes: IR triggered game camera; time-lapse plot camera; plot camera by day, infrared camera at night
  • Up to 1-year battery life; battery life calculator
  • The new-Illumi-Night Sensor provides the brightest and clearest nighttime infrared pictures
  •  Picture delay 15 seconds, 30 seconds, 1-60 minutes

Product Description

These little cameras are loaded with features like widescreen pictures and videos, new Illumi-Night sensor, battery life calculator and Plot Stalker time-lapse mode. All this in a unit smaller than your hand.

Found this video from VAOutdoorsTV taking video in the plot watcher mode using a Moultrie M80 Trail Camera.

 

 

Again, the  Moultrie Game Spy M-80 is on sale for only $119.95


 


 


 




Bobcats, deer, coyotes, bear and more on trail camera


Sep 27, 2011

These images were taken on the Reconyx RC55 remote trail camera. This video includes such a range of images from day time to night time shots even snow shots to sunshine.  Not to mention the amount of wildlife that passes in front of the trail camera from deer, bobcats, elk bear and more.

Thanks to TWayDreamin's for shooting this video

Reconyx cameras are made in the U.S.A designing and manufacturing digital infrared game cameras. 

 


 

 

 




56% off Moultrie Game Spy I-60


Sep 26, 2011

This is another great deal! List price on the Moultrie Spy I-60 is on $329.99, but today it is on sale  for only $144.99.  That is a 56% savings!  This Moultrie Game Spy is an infrared Flash Game Camera with a built-in video and picture viewer. 

Here is the official product description for the Moultrie Game Spy I-60:

Features:

  • Infrared camera with no visible white flash
  • 6.0 Mega pixels
  • 1.5-inch built-in picture and video viewer
  • Wireless remote activator
  • Rapid response time captures moving game
  • 150-day battery life
  • 50-foot flash
  • Password security feature
  • Easy-read photo strip
  • Barometric pressure reading
  • Temperature, moon phase, time, date, and camera ID on every photo and video
  • Color day pictures
  • Day and night video clips
  • Laser and IR aim for quick and precise camera set-up
  • Time lapse mode
  • Multi-shot pictures (up to 3 shots)
  • Upgradeable software
  • Weather-resistant, airtight camera housing and seal
  • Operates on 6 D-cell batteries (included)
  • Easy to operate LCD menu driven display
  • Display shows battery life remaining, pictures taken and remaining, and events occurred
  • Picture Delay, set 1-60 min.
  • Four picture resolutions (low, medium, high, and enhanced)
  • Two video resolutions (low and high)
  • 5/15/30 second video clips
  • 15 seconds. between multi-shot pictures
  • 32 MB internal memory
  • Up to 4 GB with SD card (card not included)
  • Includes USB and TV out cable, plus mounting strap
  • External power port for optional 12-volt battery support
  • Computer software requirements: Windows 2000/ME/XP/Vista
  • Includes 6-pack of D-cell batteries

Product Description

Each Moultrie digital game camera is impressive, but the I-60 is the choice for those that want it all. This winning camera is a 6.0 mega pixel resolution infrared camera with no visible white flash and includes a picture viewer, remote control and finder, rapid trigger time, 150-day battery life, pass code protection and more.

 

Again, the Moultrie Game Spy I-60 is on sale for only $144.99 at Amazon.com


 




Kodiak Bear caught on Trail Camera


Sep 24, 2011

This is a terrific shot of a Kodiak Bear. This bear has no idea there is a camera near by. Of all the places to scratch ones back this Kodiak bear picked right in front of the trail camera! Awesome!

 

Thanks to landlover2099's for taking these pictures

When an adult Kodiak male bear stands on his hind legs they can reach a height of 10ft tall and weigh any where between 800-1400 lbs. A female can weight anywhere between 500-700 lbs. The largest bear that has ever been killed in North America was from the Kodiak Island with a skull size of 30.75in. 

Do you have any pictures of a Kodiak Bear you would like to submit?

 

 

 



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